High-income taxpayers face two special taxes — a 3.8% net investment income tax (NIIT) and a 0.9% additional Medicare tax on wage and self-employment income. Here’s an overview of the taxes and what they may mean for you. 3.8% NIIT This tax applies, in addition to income tax, on your net investment income. The NIIT only affects taxpayers with adjusted gross income (AGI) exceeding $250,000 for joint filers, $200,000 for single taxpayers and heads of household, and $125,000 for married individuals filing separately. If your AGI is above the threshold that applies ($250,000, $200,000 or $125,000), the NIIT applies to the lesser of 1) your net investment income for the tax year or 2) the excess of your AGI for the tax year over your threshold amount. The “net investment income” that’s subject to the NIIT consists of interest, dividends, annuities, royalties, rents and net gains from property sales. Wage...[ Read More ]
If you’re a business owner working from home or an entrepreneur with a home-based side gig, you may qualify for valuable home office deductions. But not everyone who works from home gets the tax break. Employees who work remotely can’t deduct home office expenses under current federal tax law. To qualify for a deduction, you must use at least part of your home regularly and exclusively as either: Your principal place of business, or A place to meet with customers, clients or patients in the normal course of business. In addition, you may be able to claim deductions for maintaining a separate structure — such as a garage — where you store products or tools used solely for business purposes. Notably, “regular and exclusive” use means you must consistently use a specific identifiable area in your home for business. However, incidental or occasional personal use won’t necessarily disqualify you. Rules...[ Read More ]
If you don’t have enough federal tax withheld from your paychecks and other payments, you may have to make estimated tax payments. This is the case if you receive interest, dividends, self-employment income, capital gains or other income. Here are the applicable rules for paying estimated tax without triggering the penalty for underpayment. When are the payments due? Individuals must pay 25% of a “required annual payment” by April 15, June 15, September 15, and January 15 of the following year, to avoid an underpayment penalty. If one of those dates falls on a weekend or holiday, the payment is due on the next business day. So the third installment for 2022 is due on Wednesday, September 15. Payments are made using Form 1040-ES. How much should you pay? The required annual payment for most individuals is the lower of 90% of the tax shown on the current year’s return...[ Read More ]
During the busy holiday season, not-for-profit executives may rely on staffers to purchase gifts and holiday party supplies for the organization. But before you hand over a credit card, you need to make sure that the employee is trustworthy and understands your nonprofit’s credit card use policy. Don’t have a policy? Here’s how to establish one. Limit access Your policy should start with who is authorized to have or use a card. Nonprofits commonly issue cards to their executive directors, program directors and office managers (or other employees responsible for buying supplies). Before issuing a card to an employee — or temporarily handing one to other staffers — consider whether that person really needs it. Most can pay out of pocket and submit reimbursement requests. However, if employees travel or entertain donors regularly on your nonprofit’s behalf, it may make sense to give them cards. Communicate the rules It’s also...[ Read More ]
When you filed your federal tax return this year, were you surprised to find you owed money? You might want to change your withholding so that this doesn’t happen again next year. You might even want to adjust your withholding if you got a big refund. Receiving a tax refund essentially means you’re giving the government an interest-free loan. Adjust if necessary Taxpayers should periodically review their tax situations and adjust withholding, if appropriate. The IRS has a withholding calculator to assist you in conducting a paycheck checkup. The calculator reflects tax law changes in areas such as available itemized deductions, the child credit, the dependent credit and the repeal of dependent exemptions. You can access the IRS calculator here: https://bit.ly/33iBcZV Life changes There are some situations when you should check your withholding. In addition to tax law changes, the IRS recommends that you perform a checkup if you: Adjusted your...[ Read More ]
Are you a charitably minded individual who is also taking distributions from a traditional IRA? You may want to consider the tax advantages of making a cash donation to an IRS-approved charity out of your IRA. When distributions are taken directly out of traditional IRAs, federal income tax of up to 37% in 2022 will have to be paid. State income taxes may also be owed. Qualified charitable distributions One popular way to transfer IRA assets to charity is via a tax provision that allows IRA owners who are age 70½ or older to direct up to $100,000 per year of their IRA distributions to charity. These distributions are known as qualified charitable distributions (QCDs). The money given to charity counts toward your required minimum distributions (RMDs) but doesn’t increase your adjusted gross income (AGI) or generate a tax bill. Keeping the donation out of your AGI may be important...[ Read More ]
The downturn in the stock market may have caused the value of your retirement account to decrease. But if you have a traditional IRA, this decline may provide a valuable opportunity: It may allow you to convert your traditional IRA to a Roth IRA at a lower tax cost. Traditional vs. Roth Here’s what makes a traditional IRA different from a Roth IRA: Traditional IRA. Contributions to a traditional IRA may be deductible, depending on your modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) and whether you (or your spouse) participate in a qualified retirement plan, such as a 401(k). Funds in the account can grow tax deferred. On the downside, you generally must pay income tax on withdrawals. In addition, you’ll face a penalty if you withdraw funds before age 59½ — unless you qualify for a handful of exceptions — and you’ll face an even larger penalty if you don’t take your...[ Read More ]
Business owners are aware that the price of gas is historically high, which has made their vehicle costs soar. The average nationwide price of a gallon of unleaded regular gas on June 17 was $5, compared with $3.08 a year earlier, according to the AAA Gas Prices website. A gallon of diesel averaged $5.78 a gallon, compared with $3.21 a year earlier. Fortunately, the IRS is providing some relief. The tax agency announced an increase in the optional standard mileage rate for the last six months of 2022. Taxpayers may use the optional cents-per-mile rate to calculate the deductible costs of operating a vehicle for business. For the second half of 2022 (July 1–December 31), the standard mileage rate for business travel will be 62.5 cents per mile, up from 58.5 cents per mile for the first half of the year (January 1–June 30). There are different standard mileage rates...[ Read More ]
Starting in fiscal year 2022, all entities — except nonprofit organizations in the scope of Topic 958, Not-for-Profit Entities, and employee benefit plans — must provide detailed disclosures about government assistance. Here are the details of the new rules. Defining government assistance The term “government assistance” may refer to perks and other incentives policymakers provide to lure large companies to establish a business in their states. The goal of these incentives is to drive economic growth by boosting jobs for residents. However, government assistance can take many forms because there are many types of governments, related entities and enterprises authorized by governments to administer assistance for them. Examples of government assistance transactions include grants of assets, tax assistance, low-interest-rate loans, loan guarantees and forgiveness of liabilities. The COVID-19 pandemic significantly increased the number of entities receiving assistance and the level of government funding provided. Following new rules Accounting Standards Update (ASU) 2021-10, Government...[ Read More ]
Is your board staring at financial red flags without knowing it? Although some warning signs — such as those experienced when the pandemic first hit — are obvious, others are easy to overlook. Here are several signs of trouble that board members need to be aware of and prepared to act on. Unexplained variances and other budget issues Certain budget-related issues may hint at rocky financial times to come. Having no budget is a flashing red light and suggests an undisciplined approach to fiscal matters. But assuming management has submitted a budget, your board should ensure it’s in line with board-developed and approved strategies. Once a budget has been okayed, your board needs to compare it to actual results for unexplained variances. Some discrepancies are bound to happen, but staff should explain significant differences. There may be a reasonable explanation, such as program expansion, funding changes or macroeconomic factors. But...[ Read More ]