Starting at 5:00 p.m. on Friday, March 20, 2020, our office will be closed to the public. Team members can be reached by phone or email Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. In addition, beginning Thursday, March 26, 2020, and continuing through the two week Stay at Home order, the lobby doors to our building will be locked down.
Taxpayers now have more time to file their tax returns and pay any tax owed because of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The Treasury Department and IRS announced that the federal income tax filing due date is automatically extended from April 15, 2020, to July 15, 2020. Taxpayers can also defer making federal income tax payments, which are due on April 15, 2020, until July 15, 2020, without penalties and interest, regardless of the amount they owe. This deferment applies to all taxpayers, including individuals, trusts and estates, corporations and other non-corporate tax filers as well as those who pay self-employment tax. They can also defer their initial quarterly estimated federal income tax payments for the 2020 tax year (including any self-employment tax) from the normal April 15 deadline until July 15. No forms to file Taxpayers don’t need to file any additional forms to qualify for the automatic federal tax...[ Read More ]
On March 27, President Trump signed into law another coronavirus (COVID-19) law, which provides extensive relief for businesses and employers. Here are some of the tax-related provisions in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act). Employee retention credit The new law provides a refundable payroll tax credit for 50% of wages paid by eligible employers to certain employees during the COVID-19 crisis. Employer eligibility. The credit is available to employers with operations that have been fully or partially suspended as a result of a government order limiting commerce, travel or group meetings. The credit is also provided to employers that have experienced a greater than 50% reduction in quarterly receipts, measured on a year-over-year basis. The credit isn’t available to employers receiving Small Business Interruption Loans under the new law. Wage eligibility. For employers with an average of 100 or fewer full-time employees in 2019, all employee wages are eligible,...[ Read More ]
If you’re self-employed and work out of an office in your home, you may be entitled to home office deductions. However, you must satisfy strict rules. If you qualify, you can deduct the “direct expenses” of the home office. This includes the costs of painting or repairing the home office and depreciation deductions for furniture and fixtures used there. You can also deduct the “indirect” expenses of maintaining the office. This includes the allocable share of utility costs, depreciation and insurance for your home, as well as the allocable share of mortgage interest, real estate taxes and casualty losses. In addition, if your home office is your “principal place of business,” the costs of traveling between your home office and other work locations are deductible transportation expenses, rather than nondeductible commuting costs. And, generally, you can deduct the cost (reduced by the percentage of non-business use) of computers and related...[ Read More ]
If you own a home, the interest you pay on your home mortgage may provide a tax break. However, many people believe that any interest paid on their home mortgage loans and home equity loans is deductible. Unfortunately, that’s not true. First, keep in mind that you must itemize deductions in order to take advantage of the mortgage interest deduction. Deduction and limits for “acquisition debt” A personal interest deduction generally isn’t allowed, but one kind of interest that is deductible is interest on mortgage “acquisition debt.” This means debt that’s: 1) secured by your principal home and/or a second home, and 2) incurred in acquiring, constructing or substantially improving the home. You can deduct interest on acquisition debt on up to two qualified residences: your primary home and one vacation home or similar property. The deduction for acquisition debt comes with a stipulation. From 2018 through 2025, you can’t deduct the...[ Read More ]
If you’re getting ready to file your 2019 tax return, and your tax bill is higher than you’d like, there may still be an opportunity to lower it. If you qualify, you can make a deductible contribution to a traditional IRA right up until the Wednesday, April 15, 2020, filing date and benefit from the resulting tax savings on your 2019 return. Do you qualify? You can make a deductible contribution to a traditional IRA if: You (and your spouse) aren’t an active participant in an employer-sponsored retirement plan, or You (or your spouse) are an active participant in an employer plan, and your modified adjusted gross income (AGI) doesn’t exceed certain levels that vary from year-to-year by filing status. For 2019, if you’re a joint tax return filer covered by an employer plan, your deductible IRA contribution phases out over $103,000 to $123,000 of modified AGI. If you’re single...[ Read More ]
If you made large gifts to your children, grandchildren or other heirs last year, it’s important to determine whether you’re required to file a 2019 gift tax return. And in some cases, even if it’s not required to file one, it may be beneficial to do so anyway. Who must file? Generally, you must file a gift tax return for 2019 if, during the tax year, you made gifts: That exceeded the $15,000-per-recipient gift tax annual exclusion (other than to your U.S. citizen spouse), That you wish to split with your spouse to take advantage of your combined $30,000 annual exclusion, That exceeded the $155,000 annual exclusion for gifts to a noncitizen spouse, To a Section 529 college savings plan and wish to accelerate up to five years’ worth of annual exclusions ($75,000) into 2019, Of future interests — such as remainder interests in a trust — regardless of the amount, or...[ Read More ]
  The number of people engaged in the “gig” or sharing economy has grown in recent years. And there are tax consequences for the people who perform these jobs, such as providing car rides, renting spare rooms, delivering food and walking dogs. Generally, if you receive income from these gigs, it’s taxable. That’s true even if the income comes from a side job and if you don’t receive a 1099-MISC or 1099-K form reporting the money you made. You may need to make quarterly estimated tax payments because your income isn’t subject to withholding. Some or all of your business expenses may be deductible on your tax return, subject to the normal tax limitations and rules. Contact us to learn more.
Not-for-profit board directors, trustees and key employees must not have a direct or indirect financial interest in a transaction or arrangement that might benefit them personally. This is why nonprofits are required to have a written conflict-of-interest policy. To stress the importance of this requirement, the IRS asks you to acknowledge the existence of a policy on your annual Form 990. Your policy should define all potential conflicts and provide procedures for avoiding them. It’s also critical to outline the steps you’ll take if a possible conflict arises. Contact us for help crafting a thorough policy.
If you save for retirement with an IRA or other plan, be aware there’s a new law that makes several changes to these accounts. For example, the SECURE Act repealed the maximum age for making traditional IRA contributions. Before 2020, traditional IRA contributions weren’t allowed once you reached age 70½. Starting in 2020, an individual of any age can make contributions, as long as he or she has compensation. The required minimum distribution age was also raised from 70½ to 72. In addition, penalty-free withdrawals up to $5,000 are now allowed from a retirement plan for birth or adoption expenses. These are only some of the new law changes. Questions? Don’t hesitate to contact us.